The One Minute Geographer: The Great Plains — The Poverty Line

In today ‘s post we’ll look at “The Poverty Line” on the Magical Meridian. This line is a reflection of the fact that there is distinct gradient of higher income in the north to lower income in the south. Rates of people in poverty reflect that trend. On the map the 10 counties with their names in black have the lowest poverty rates; those in red have the 10 highest poverty rates.

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Geography professor (retired) writes The One Minute Geographer with a featured series: This Fragile Earth, and a book review series: Great Translations

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Jim Fonseca

Jim Fonseca

Geography professor (retired) writes The One Minute Geographer with a featured series: This Fragile Earth, and a book review series: Great Translations

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